1918 RP PC British Artillery in Italy, 315th Siege Battery with Howitzer, 1 of 3

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Seller: pmcdonal123 (1,441) 100%, Location: London, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 223236500223 One of ten real photo postcards offered for sale from British heavy artillery troops serving in northern Italy in 1918, around Asiago and Mount Grappa. The troops were from the 315th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, part of the 94th Heavy Artillery Group, equipped with 4x6-inch howitzers. Three of the cards show the howitzers, three cards show the surrounding area (a ruined bridge, Altopiano di Asiago, and Mte Grappa), and three show the troops themselves, including one group shot of over 100 men. A final card shows a magnificent soldier on horseback, possibly a Royal Engineer. ----------- This card shows 12 officers and men around a howitzer. Reverse has handwritten: 315 Battery Italy 1918 Unposted The card is a little grubby at edges but overall is in good condition for its age (see scans).POSTCARD watermark has been added by me to the scan, it is not on original.Please contact me for prices if trackable delivery required.------------ British troops were sent to Italy in 1918 to help the Italians after their defeat at Caporetto in October 1917 by Austro-Hungarian forces, reinforced by German units and using poison gas. According to Wikipedia: During World War I, the Italian Fourth Army was positioned between the Asiago plateau and the Carnic Alps. During the Caporetto disaster, it had to withdraw to the Mount Grappa massif, where it won the defensive battle of Mount Grappa. It then participated in the successful Battle of the Piave River (June 1918) and Battle of Vittorio Veneto (October–November 1918). http://greatwarforum.org/topic/167131-army-corps-italy/ states: In early 1918...94th HAG (302nd, 307th, 315th, 316th, 317th Siege Batteries) was moved to the Italian Fourth Army Sector at Asiago....A major offensive was planned for the Italian front northwards up the valley of the River Brenta with the Italian 20th Corps on the right, the French 12th Corps in the centre and the British 14th Corps on the left directed at Asiago. The only British troops remaining in Italy were by then 7th, 23rd and 48th Divisions and 15th, 24th, 80th, 94th and 104th Heavy Artillery Groups RGA, these consisting of 19th, 90th, 155th, and 1/1st Warwickshire Heavy batteries (each 6 x 60 pr (24)) and 105th, 137th, 171st, 172nd, 176th, 181st, 197th, 229th, 240th, 247th, 289th, 294th, 302nd, 307th, 315th, 316th, 317th, 390th, 391st and 438th Siege Batteries each 4x6-inch howitzers and one 9.2-ich howitzer. The number of Siege Batteries in the British Army had increased from just three Regular batteries in 1914 to over 400 by the end of the war. http://longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-royal-artillery-in-the-first-world-war/the-siege-batteries-of-the-royal-garrison-artillery/ states: Siege Batteries RGA were equipped with heavy howitzers, sending large calibre high explosive shells in high trajectory, plunging fire. The usual armaments were 6 inch, 8 inch and 9.2 inch howitzers, although some had huge railway- or road-mounted 12 inch howitzers. As British artillery tactics developed, the Siege Batteries were most often employed in destroying or neutralising the enemy artillery, as well as putting destructive fire down on strongpoints, dumps, store, roads and railways behind enemy lines. Subject: Corps & Regiments, County/ Country: Italy, Postage Condition: Unposted, Country/Region of Manufacture: Italy, Publisher: Unknown, Type: Real Photographic (RP), Year: 1918, Military Branch: Territorial

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